Will Eating Hemp Food Products Cause Me To Fail A Drug Test?


Will Consuming Products Made From Hemp Result in a Negative Result on a Drug Test?
One issue that is often asked is whether or not consuming hemp seed, hemp oil, hemp hearts, or hemp protein powder would result in a negative result on a routine or random drug test. This is a popular query that is asked very frequently.

The answer varies, but it is contingent on a number of different circumstances.

The drug screens for THC as well as other similar substances, and they may often be detected from three days up to ten days after using the substance. As a consequence of the fat-soluble nature of the cannabinoids, there would be good benefits in patients who strongly used cannabis for up to ten months after they stopped using cannabis. This would be the case in patients who heavily used cannabis. As a result, the response to this question is contingent upon whether or not you make regular use of cannabis.
If this is not the case, and the only way for THC to enter your body is through the regular consumption of products derived from hemp, and if you do not consume more hemp products than the recommended amount, then it is highly unlikely that you will fail a drug test solely based on the amount of hemp you consume.

The majority of hemp foods that are sold in North America come from either Canada or Europe, where they were cultivated. These goods must adhere to stringent restrictions, which limit the quantity of THC that may be found in the mature hemp plant. The maximum permissible percentage is less than 0.3 percent, and in addition, the goods are checked and cleansed of resin when they are being harvested to guarantee that they adhere to the federal criteria. As a consequence of this, after the product has been released onto the market, there ought should be extremely minimal quantities, or perhaps none at all, of THC present.

Some companies limit the amount of THC in their products to an even higher level than the one that is advised. There is a promise made by Manitoba Harvest Hemp Foods that their goods will not be psychoactive and will not result in a false positive on a drug test. The company restricts the amount of THC that their product may contain, which is set at 0.001 percent.

Find hemp growers that are also members of the TestPledge for food and speak with them. This is a voluntary initiative to ensure that hemp foods do not cause a confirmed positive drug test for marijuana by limiting the THC to 5.0 parts per million for hemp oil and 1.5 parts per million for hemp nuts. The initiative was created to prevent hemp foods from causing a positive drug test result for marijuana.
This means that in order to obtain 600 ug of THC from hemp oil, a person would have to consume more than 8 tablespoon servings, which is equivalent to half of an 8-ounce bottle of pure hemp oil. This is the dose that was found to not cause confirmed positive urine tests for marijuana with a large margin of safety. At this time, the portion size that is advised for daily consumption is one to two teaspoons.
Regarding hemp nut, the recommended daily intake would be up to 14 ounces (more than a can containing 12 ounces) of hemp nut in order to avoid surpassing the 600 ug THC dosage.

For more information, please visit the following link for the specifics of the TestPledge and an explanation of what the daily restrictions would entail:

The THC concentrations that are present in Canadian hemp seed products appear to be sufficiently low to prevent any confirmed positives from the extended and extensive consumption of hemp foods, according to the findings of an evaluation of the impact of hemp food consumption on workplace drug tests.
On August 26, 2013, the United States Air Force issued an order banning the eating of blueberry-flavored Chobani yogurt because of the presence of hemp seed or hemp seed oil in the product’s active components. Despite this, Chobani yogurt in general is still permitted to be consumed.

The passage may be summarized as follows:

Studies have demonstrated that goods prepared from hemp seed and hemp seed oil may contain varied quantities of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), an active constituent of marijuana that is detectable under the Air Force Drug Testing Program. THC is one of the compounds that gives marijuana its psychoactive effects. It is forbidden for military personnel to consume any goods that include hemp seed or hemp seed oil, or that are produced from these ingredients, in order to maintain their combat preparedness. Military personnel are in breach of Article 92 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice if they do not comply with the required requirements of this paragraph.

According to Army Times, Capt. Adam Koudelka, who is the legal adviser for the Drug Testing Lab at the Air Force Medical Operations Agency in Texas, stated that the Air Force has not prohibited military personnel from consuming Chobani Greek yogurt. Rather, only Chobani yogurt that contains hemp seed or hemp seed oil is prohibited. This applies to any product that contains or is derived from hemp seed or hemp seed oil.

A spokesperson for Chobani said that it is not feasible to establish with absolute certainty the impact that the blueberry yogurt might have on a drug test. There are about 10 grams of hemp seeds in the blueberry flavor. According to the information provided by Chobani spokesperson Jessica DiGennaro in an e-mail, the greatest quantity of THC that may be found in the yogurt would be 1 part per million. The THC content of the hemp seeds is less than 10 parts per million per 100 grams of hemp seeds. According to Army Times, the cutoff level for failing a drug test administered by the federal government is set at 50 parts of THC per billion per 100 kilos.

What is the bottom line?

he bottom line is that it is highly unlikely that the consumption of solely hemp food products would cause you to fail a drug test if you are consuming verified products from either Canada or Europe that meet the regulatory standards in reasonable amounts. This is especially true if you are consuming the food products in reasonable amounts. However, the decision to consume hemp food products is strictly a risk-to-benefit decision that is determined by how comfortable you are with the risk of the possible consequences of failing the drug test. This comfort level is determined by how much you stand to benefit from consuming hemp food products. Because there is no way to know for sure whether or not you will pass the test, you need to compare the potential positive effects of consuming hemp against the potential negative effects of a positive result on the drug test. Before you commit to consuming hemp food items, you need to ensure that you have the mental capacity to deal with the repercussions of making a mistake.

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